Public education on Eczema needed to raise awareness of this skin condition

Public education on various health conditions by the media that includes mental illness and physical illnesses has been effective in getting people to better manage their specific conditions.

However, very little is known about Eczema which affects many people who include children and adults. In the U.S, Eczema affects about 10 percent to 20 percent of infants and about 3 percent of adults and children. I am sure, Singapore has its fair share of Eczema patients with some diagnosed with the ailment and others unaware that they have it.

Eczema is a term for a group of medical conditions that causes the skin to become inflamed or irritated – the most common type being atopic dermatitis or atopic eczema. The skin becomes itchy and rashes will appear. These rashes will appear on the face, back of the knees, wrists, hands, or feet. It may also affect other areas as well.

If we have sensitive skin and are not sure if Eczema has hit us, bathing too often or washing hands frequently will only cause harmful effects to the skin. This is why it is useful to see doctors who specialise in this area or at least see one who is knowledgeable in Eczema.

Generally, people fear what they don’t understand. For instance, some people might mistakenly believe that Eczema is contagious, when in fact it is not. Hence the need for public education on this health issue.

My recent encounter with this skin disease which was fortunately detected early by a knowledgeable and experience General Practitioner (GP) helped a great deal. She advised me to bathe only once a day, apply Eczema prone skin moisturizer and Eczema prone body wash, take omega 3 fish oil and use cloves when washing dishes or clothing.

The itchiness was so bad that I could not sleep at night and I began to feel depressed.

A bottle of Eczema prone skin moisturizer cost $42 and Eczema prone body wash is priced at around $29. As these products are rather expensive, perhaps the Ministry of Health could purchase these and offer it at discounted or affordable prices at the polyclinics and hospitals for the benefit and convenience of our patients. Even King Salmon Omega 3 fish oil which has several benefits can be made available here.

Together with medications to treat allergy and itchiness, the GP also prescribed oral steroids which will be tapered down as the conditions improves. She comforted me by saying that in cases such as mine, short-term dosage of oral steroids is needed rather than steroid cream, and will not adversely affect the bones.

More than 10 years ago, I was taken off a medication that caused rashes, and the good doctor reminded me to be mindful as my immune system is weak and thus the rash condition that I encountered a decade ago will return and on off.

The good news is that within a week of her medical care, the Eczema has been contained and I have every confidence of a recovery in due course.

For the record, Eczema is not contagious. It is always useful to share our life experiences when we have benefitted from such a health issue, so that those who might be prone to having Eczema will be well positioned to handle the situation better.

As such conditions vary with different people, it is best to seek medical advice and treatment from the professionals/experts and they include doctors from the National Skin Centre (NSC) in Singapore for those who require treatment living there. NSC is based at 1 Mandalay Rd, Singapore 30820.

For patients trying to grapple with this skin illness, the vulnerable (winclude the elderly lonely), understanding, empathy and structural support on the part of family members, religious groups, grassroots leaders and the community can help the sufferers cope much better.

RAYMOND ANTHONY FERNANDO

Disclaimer: These treatment and medications described in this article have worked well for me. Please consult a qualified doctor or specialist for your own condition/s.

PROFILE OF THE WRITER

raymond-still

Raymond Anthony Fernando is a motivational speaker, poet, author, trainer, songwriter, freelance television actor, ghostwriter, media celebrity, regular newspaper forum page writer and an advocate for the mentally ill.

He is a volunteer with the Institute of Mental Health. The author of 32 books was married to Doris Lau Siew Lang, herself an author of 8 books. Doris was called to the Lord in April 2014. This Model Caregiver 2007 and Mental Health Champion 2010, who is born on Valentine’s Day, has contributed 31 years of service to the public sector, 15 years of experience in public relations work, and received several awards and commendations from government organisations.

Raymond attributes his success to his beloved wife, Doris, who has always been his greatest inspiration.

Move over nasi lemak burger, lobster nasi lemak coming through

Lawa Bintang’s lobster nasi lemak consists of a whole lobster with cheese and seasoned with herbs, and served with sambal chilli, fried egg and anchovies. — TODAY pic

SINGAPORE, Aug 13 — Over at an industrial estate in Tampines, there has been a growing buzz at a coffeeshop where a long line forms every morning — sometimes up to two hours — by people waiting to try the latest street food fad: Lobster nasi lemak.

The dish is served with a whole lobster filled with cheese, seasoned with ground herbs and comes with the usual nasi lemak condiments — fried egg, sambal peanuts, anchovies and sambal chilli — and is priced at S$22 (RM70).

Co-owner of halal eatery Lawa Bintang, Sarena Talib, 45, first introduced lobster to the traditional nasi lemak dish sometime in March. She said the younger generation is more open and receptive to new food offerings, so she decided to be “daring enough” to include it in her nasi lemak.

Sarena started out offering her nasi lemak with sotong goreng (fried squid). Heartened by the good response to her “fusion dish”, she decided to add lobster, cray fish and softshell crab to her list of offerings.

Originally, Sarena just thought of offering grilled lobsters. But after exchanging ideas with her nephew, who is a chef, “he tried to make it more interesting by adding cheese”.

The former property agent entered the food business about four years ago when the property market slowed down. The transition, she said, was easier for her as her family had been selling nasi padang in Bedok North “for 40 years”.

“When we were young, my mother taught me to cook. She made sure all the children learned how to cook,” she added.

Sarena, who runs the stall with her husband, orders 20kg worth of lobster every day, but she said, it usually runs out within two hours.

Besides lobster nasi lemak, Lawa Bintang also offers soft-shell crab, cray fish and sotong nasi lemak. — TODAY pic Besides lobster nasi lemak, Lawa Bintang also offers soft-shell crab, cray fish and sotong nasi lemak. — TODAY picThe queues started to get longer earlier this week after some food bloggers wrote about her lobster nasi lemak. So much so, Sarena has implemented a limit on orders per customer.

“We had one customer order five lobsters (at once) and the people behind didn’t have a chance to get it. So we set a rule that one person can only order two lobster nasi lemak,” Sarena said.

When TODAY visited the stall on Thursday at lunch time, there were about 35 people in line.

Teacher Zahira Ali, 30, said: “I don’t mind paying such an amount for a nasi lemak lobster. Grilled lobster alone can be quite pricey as well. It can cost around S$50 to S$60 dollars alone.”

Another customer Kenny Chee, 51, who went with his family to try it for the first time and waited for 1 hour and 40 minutes, but did not get to try the lobster nasi lemak, so he ordered the nasi lemak sotong goreng instead.

“My colleague tried and he raved about it so we wanted to try it,” said Chee said, who said although he didn’t get to try the lobster, it was still worth the wait.

“It (the sotong goring) had a nice balance of sweetness and spiciness and the meat was well-marinated. They used basmati rice which is moist and has a nice bite to it,” Chee said.

Account Assistant Fathiyah Al Hilal, 27, who came back for the second time for the lobster nasi lemak also had to settle for another dish. “I had the nasi lemak sotong in March. It was very tasty …

“(The lobster) is sold out so I will get the sotong again. I don’t mind queueing because I know it’s good,” said Fathiyah. — TODAY

*Lawa Bintang is located at Blk 9008, Tampines street 93, and opens from 8am to 2pm from Tuesdays to Thursdays, 10am to 2pm on Fridays, and from 9am to 2pm on Saturdays and Sundays. Closed on Mondays.- MMO

LOVE CONQUERS ALL

 

In memory of my late wife who was called to the Lord in April 2014.

Often marriages are put to the test when couples are confronted with financial problems or if a spouse is stricken with chronic illnesses. All marriage will go through good and bad times. But if couples stick to one another during those rough times, the relationship will improve steadily as time goes by.

I was a caregiver to my late wife, Doris Lau who was stricken with schizophrenia at the tender age of 17. My wife passed away 3 years ago after she lost the battle to pneumonia.

Be mindful of the symptoms of schizophrenia
Coping with the symptoms of schizophrenia can be extremely difficult for family members who remember how active a person was before he/she became ill. This illness is terrifying because it is unpredictable. After caring for Doris for 40 years, I became more alert to the warning signs of schizophrenia.

A reason to love, a reason to marry

Many people find it very hard to believe that I married Doris despite her mental illness.

So why did I marry Doris?
Unlike the many girls that I dated, Doris was very down-to-earth. I found her to be sincere and caring. This was the woman that would change my life -dramatically.

I told myself that the woman I marry, whoever she is, I will love forever. I believe that Doris are I were fated to be husband and wife. She was born on All Saints’ Day and I am born on Valentine’s Day. Undoubtedly, Good Friday has special significance to both my wife and I. By some strange coincidence, 12th April 1974 was the day that I first met my wife. And it happened to be on Good Friday.

And though it was an arduous and painful journey for me to manage my wife’s dreaded schizophrenia for more than three decades, I often draw my strength and compassion from Jesus. Can you imagine what will happen to Doris if she had married the wrong man?

My wife had a total of five illnesses, including schizophrenia, arthritis, diabetes, high cholesterol and incontinence. Being the sole caregiver to my wife for more 4 decades was no easy feat and I suffered burnout so many times.

Memories are made of this

But strange as it may seem, I had grown to love Doris more and more as I saw her struggle with so many illnesses. And it was such a joy for me to see my wife enjoy life to the fullest despite the suffering that she had to go through.

As we celebrated our wedding anniversaries through our 40 years of blissful union, I recollect the scenes when I took my marriage vows in 1972 when we got married.

“Will you Raymond Anthony Fernando take Doris Lau Siew Lang to be your wedded wife, to live together in the estate of matrimony? Will you love her, honour her, comfort her, and keep her in sickness and in health, forsaking all others, be true to her as long as you both shall live?”

These marriage vows and my Catholic teachings had given me the strength and courage to love and care for my wife despite the arduous journey of being her sole caregiver. And when you are looking after a loved one with mental illness, you must be prepared to walk alone in the dark because there is still so much discrimination and prejudice against the mentally ill. That’s the bad news.

But the good news is that through my love, encouragement and support, I had managed to turn Doris into an author of not one, but 8 books. This is a remarkable achievement for someone suffering from a serious mental disorder.

Through the many talks that I have given, I have always mentioned that people with mental illness just need one person to love them and with medication, they will recover.
Love conquers all

During the SARS outbreak in 2003, Doris suffered her 10th relapse. It was another very difficult period in my life. I had no choice but to admit Doris into the Institute of Mental Health (IMH), but at the back of my mind, I feared that the government in wanting to stop the spread of SARS , would close all doors for hospital visits.

Two days after Doris was admitted to hospital, the Ministry of Health (MOH) imposed the no-visitors ruling at all public hospitals and I could not visit my wife for one solid month. Doris was shattered, I was shattered. My heart was torn apart.

Usually I would visit Doris every day and spend as much time as I could with her as emotional support plays a big part in her recovery. This time around, the picture was totally different. My wife’s biggest fear became a reality. In her disoriented state, Doris “believed” that I had abandoned her. Left her for another woman.

After one month, through several appeals, I managed to see my wife. When I saw her from a distance, I ran as fast as I could. I tripped and fell. My knees were badly bruised, but I did not feel any pain because when I spotted Doris, all pain — physical and emotional seemed to go away. Indeed, love conquers all.

When Doris returned for home leave 4 weeks later, she was still not out of the woods. She had to continue her ECT (Electro Convulsive Therapy) and she was only 50% recovered. It was close to our 29th anniversary and I wrote her a poem entitled “Ring on your finger” framed it on an A1 size poster and mounted it on the wall. The moment she saw it, her eyes lit up and so did her heart. She kept reading the poem, over and over again, until it brought about her total recovery. She hugged me and told me, that the delusion that I had abandoned her was not true and I really loved her. Once again, the healing power of love reunited us.


Ring on your finger

A poetic tribute to my lovely wife, the late Doris Lau Siew Lang

My Dearest Doris,
It was placed on your finger many years ago
That wedding ring now in our home, still glows
Though you are safe with God, my love for you, Doris, continues to flow
This, I am sure, my love, you already know

The colour gold of the ring reminds me of how pretty you are
Your inner beauty that is sparkling like an evening star
The shape of the ring
Reminds me of one thing
You have carved our destiny
Through happy times, and amid uncertainty

The ring bears my name
It remains the same
The words have not faded
And our love has been upgraded
It reminds me that I will always belong to, Doris
It is a documented promise

The ring stood out on your finger that was so tender
It reminded me of how fragile you are
This ring on your finger reminded me that we have come this far
You will always have a place deep in my heart Doris, my eternal partner
And even if I have to start life all over again,
I will still choose you, Doris
And no other

RAYMOND ANTHONY FERNANDO

PROFILE OF THE WRITER

raymond-still

Raymond Anthony Fernando is a motivational speaker, poet, author, trainer, songwriter, freelance television actor, ghostwriter, media celebrity, regular newspaper forum page writer and an advocate for the mentally ill.

He is a volunteer with the Institute of Mental Health. The author of 32 books was married to Doris Lau Siew Lang, herself an author of 8 books. Doris was called to the Lord in April 2014. This Model Caregiver 2007 and Mental Health Champion 2010, who is born on Valentine’s Day, has contributed 31 years of service to the public sector, 15 years of experience in public relations work, and received several awards and commendations from government organisations.

Raymond attributes his success to his beloved wife, Doris, who has always been his greatest inspiration.

Motivate jobless Singaporeans to attend training courses by providing a training allowance: An open proposal to the Singapore Government

In an effort to get all Singaporeans to upgrade their skills in an ever-fast changing world to meet global challenges, the Singapore Government has come up with a skills future credit in which those who attend training courses need not have to fork out cash, but can use the skills credits to pay for a wide range of approved courses.

Time and again government leaders have been reminding Singaporeans to attend training courses.

Unfortunately, the take-up rate for the skills credit scheme for training courses is weak, and there is a dire need to examine why many unemployed Singaporeans are not taking advantage of this scheme.

It was only when I attended a training course that I now fully understand why this is so. Let me recap my experience.

I am 67 years old, a Singapore citizen and have been unemployed for more than 10 years. I recently attended an 8-day full-time course (4 modules) that was conducted by Asia Gold Bell Singapore in Paya Lebar. This is to equip me with the necessary skills to get back into the workforce.

The 4 modules included:

(a)Maintain personal presentation at supervisory level.

(b) Communicate and relative effectively.

(c) Work in a team.

(d) Solve problems and make decisions at operational level.

The course was full funded by the Government using the skills credit. The trainer, Keith Yuen was very good. Kudos to Yuen for motivating the 20 participants.

I was told that people like myself are not allowed to claim a training allowance through workfare. I have been unemployed for more than a decade. On the other hand, those who are currently employed can claim the training allowance through the workfare scheme. There were several participants who are unemployed.

May I ask if the government is prepared to review the scheme to provide a training allowance for the total number of training hours for Singaporeans who want to upgrade themselves. In my case, this work out works out to 36 training hours?

The course started on Monday 17th July and ended on Wednesday 26th July 2017. It does not make sense to me that those who are employed can be given a training allowance while those who are out of work can’t make any claim whatsoever.

Participants had little or no choice but to take their meals which include breakfast and lunch at the Kopi Tiam Food Court at this place. It is expensive to eat at the food court and the meals cost at least $10 per day, which works out to around $80 for the 8 days training. Then what about transport cost? For Singaporeans who are unemployed, it will be a financial strain on them. This amount can be used for 2 weeks marketing for those who are jobless. More so when the cost of living is skyrocketing.

On the 19th July 2017, I wrote to the Employment & Employability Institute, e2i as well as phoned one of the staff there, but at first no one was willing to give me a reply. I then had to write an email to Mr Heng Chee How in his capacity as Deputy Secretary of NTUC and copied it to Mr Chan Chun Sing, the Secretary General of NTUC, having to explain myself all over again.

Mr Heng who is a fine gentleman and who cares about my welfare and that of all Singaporeans took the imitative and informed the management of e21. This is the kind of leader Singapore needs.

On Thursday 27th July, a Ms Irene, coach at e21 phoned me to apologize for the delay in replying to me as she informed me she was on leave.

In striving for excellence, let us not just implement a scheme or policy without studying the implications. Moreover, the media has an important role to play in highlighting constructive and useful suggestions. Forums letters that can help make improvements to any policy or scheme should be published with a mindset that active citizenry plays an important role in nation-building.

Policies that are outdated or not fine-tuned will not help to build a better society. We cannot have a “one-size fit all” scheme that benefits some Singaporeans, and does not provide the much-needed support for another group of Singaporeans.
I would therefore urge the Singapore Government to consider reviewing the skills credit scheme to allow unemployed Singaporeans to be given the same training allowance that employed Singaporeans get when they attend such courses.

I have every confidence that if such an allowance can be given to unemployed Singaporeans, much more jobless Singaporeans will be motivated to attend training courses to upgrade themselves, and the scheme will become a success story.

The Ministry of Manpower and NTUC could undertake a brainstorming project to fully understand why the skills credit scheme is not working as well as it ought to. Civil servants must feel ‘comfortable’ to give their points of view and provide useful suggestions to improve the lives of all Singaporeans.

RAYMOND ANTHONY FERNANDO

PROFILE OF THE WRITER

raymond-still

Raymond Anthony Fernando is a motivational speaker, poet, author, trainer, songwriter, freelance television actor, ghostwriter, media celebrity, regular newspaper forum page writer and an advocate for the mentally ill.

He is a volunteer with the Institute of Mental Health. The author of 32 books was married to Doris Lau Siew Lang, herself an author of 8 books. Doris was called to the Lord in April 2014. This Model Caregiver 2007 and Mental Health Champion 2010, who is born on Valentine’s Day, has contributed 31 years of service to the public sector, 15 years of experience in public relations work, and received several awards and commendations from government organisations.

Raymond attributes his success to his beloved wife, Doris, who has always been his greatest inspiration.

Lee siblings welcome PM’s offer to settle dispute in private

Dr Lee Wei Ling, Singapore Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong and Lee Hsien Yang are seen in these file photos. — TODAY pic

SINGAPORE, July 6 — Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong’s siblings said this morning they welcome his offer to manage their disagreement away from the public eye, and they would stop posting on social media “provided that we and our father’s wish are not attacked or misrepresented”.

Two days after the parliamentary debates earlier this week over their allegations that saw 29 Members of Parliament speak about the issues, Lee Hsien Yang and Dr Lee Wei Ling released a seven-page public statement on Facebook putting forth the background to the dispute and their reasons for going public.

They also revealed that soon after their first joint statement on June 14, which set off the public spat over the past weeks, they had privately offered a “ceasefire” but their “attempts at reconciliation” were rebuffed.

They added: “We attempted to reach out over the past two years, through various intermediaries… We look forward to talking without the involvement of lawyers or government agencies.”

PM first to invoke lawyers, rebuffed attempts at relocation

They claimed that PM Lee quarrelled with them on April 12, 2015, the day their father founding Prime Minister Lee Kuan Yew’s will was read. And he had allegedly not spoken to them since.

They also added that PM Lee was the first to invoke lawyers, a move that “gobsmacked” them since they were “were siblings discussing (their) fathers’ house”.

Shortly after he wrote to them that he had hired Lucien Wong to deal with the situation and asked them for their lawyers, all direct communication ceased. They added that the first Chinese New Year reunion dinner following Lee Kuan Yew’s death, all relatives were invited except them.

They said they attempted to reach out over the past two years through various intermediaries and even privately offered a ceasefire shortly after their first public statement on June 14, but their “attempts at reconciliation were rebuffed”.

“We therefore welcome Hsien Loong’s stated desire on July 4, 2017 to manage his disagreement with us in private. We look forward to talking without the involvement of lawyers or government agencies,” their statement read.

Independent in quiry needed, not Parliamentary sitting

In their latest seven-page public statement, they reiterated allegations that PM Lee misused his power as prime minister and had hijacked the organs of state to pursue his personal goals.

In a separate 10-page document, also released on Facebook on Thursday, they summarised the proof of their accusations shared to date. The eight-point summary included accusing PM Lee of misleading their father into believing that 38 Oxley Road was either already gazetted or would “inevitably” be gazetted on his passing, and using a “secret ministerial committee” to challenge Lee Kuan Yew’s Final Will.

Saying that they “love Singapore” and “want only that it prospers, under a government that has integrity and respects the rule of law”, they again said they would not have brought this dispute into the public eye if there was “a neutral and unbiased venue to resolve (their) differences in private”.

They also insisted that the recently-concluded two-day parliamentary sitting raised more questions and answers, and without an opportunity to present their point of view in Parliament, they had “no choice” but to make their response through this public statement.

Parliament, they insisted, was no place to investigate their accusations of abuse of power, given that PM Lee’s party controls almost all the seats in the House, so MPs cannot effectively question him.

They also said it seems releasing “further evidence on social media” at this time will “only muddy the facts, and put pressure on government agencies to make excuses for PM Lee”.

“If there is ever a truly independent inquiry to examine the evidence, they are welcome to ask. Ultimately, it is up to the people of Singapore whether they hold Lee Hsien Loong to a true accounting,” they said.

Concluding their statement by saying that they are not politicians and have no wish to see Singapore “embroiled in a never-ending public argument”, they will “cease presenting further evidence on social media” on the condition that their fathers’ wishes are “not attacked or misrepresented”.

They also thanked the numerous Singaporeans who had reached out to give them their support and gave their views.

They said: “Ultimately, it is up to the government, and the people of Singapore, to decide whether and how to hold Lee Hsien Loong to account.”

PM waives Parliamentary privilege

Lee Hsien Yang and Dr Lee Wei Ling had been embroiled in a public dispute with their eldest brother PM Lee Hsien Loong over the fate of their father’s house on 38 Oxley Road which blew up in the public sphere after a six-page statement released on June 14, accusing PM Lee of abuses of power for personal gain.

But during the parliamentary debate which spanned almost 11 hours across two days, none of the MPs who spoke substantiated any allegations of abuse of power hurled against PM Lee by his siblings.

In contrast, the government has been shown to have “acted properly and with due process”, PM Lee said as he wrapped up the debate on Tuesday.

He added that facts and explanations have been put on the record, and Singaporeans have been given “a full account of how the government works, and what the government has done, in the case of 38 Oxley Road”.

Yesterday, PM Lee also waived his Parliamentary privilege and released to the media his ministerial statements and the accompanying materials, including email exchanges between family members.

By doing so, it means if any part of his statement is disputed, further legal action can be pursued. — TODAY

SINGAPORE, July 6 — Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong’s siblings said this morning they welcome his offer to manage their disagreement away from the public eye, and they would stop posting on social media “provided that we and our father’s wish are not attacked or misrepresented”. Two days after the parliamentary debates earlier this week over their allegations that saw 29 Members of Parliament speak about the issues, Lee Hsien Yang and Dr Lee Wei Ling released a seven-page public statement on Facebook putting forth the background to the dispute and their reasons for going public. They also revealed that soon after their first joint statement on June 14, which set off the public spat over the past weeks, they had privately offered a “ceasefire” but their “attempts at reconciliation” were rebuffed. They added: “We attempted to reach out over the past two years, through various intermediaries… We look forward to talking without the involvement of lawyers or government agencies.” PM first to invoke lawyers, rebuffed attempts at relocation They claimed that PM Lee quarrelled with them on April 12, 2015, the day their father founding Prime Minister Lee Kuan Yew’s will was read. And he had allegedly not spoken to them since. They also added that PM Lee was the first to invoke lawyers, a move that “gobsmacked” them since they were “were siblings discussing (their) fathers’ house”. Shortly after he wrote to them that he had hired Lucien Wong to deal with the situation and asked them for their lawyers, all direct communication ceased. They added that the first Chinese New Year reunion dinner following Lee Kuan Yew’s death, all relatives were invited except them. They said they attempted to reach out over the past two years through various intermediaries and even privately offered a ceasefire shortly after their first public statement on June 14, but their “attempts at reconciliation were rebuffed”. “We therefore welcome Hsien Loong’s stated desire on July 4, 2017 to manage his disagreement with us in private. We look forward to talking without the involvement of lawyers or government agencies,” their statement read. Independent in quiry needed, not Parliamentary sitting In their latest seven-page public statement, they reiterated allegations that PM Lee misused his power as prime minister and had hijacked the organs of state to pursue his personal goals. In a separate 10-page document, also released on Facebook on Thursday, they summarised the proof of their accusations shared to date. The eight-point summary included accusing PM Lee of misleading their father into believing that 38 Oxley Road was either already gazetted or would “inevitably” be gazetted on his passing, and using a “secret ministerial committee” to challenge Lee Kuan Yew’s Final Will. Saying that they “love Singapore” and “want only that it prospers, under a government that has integrity and respects the rule of law”, they again said they would not have brought this dispute into the public eye if there was “a neutral and unbiased venue to resolve (their) differences in private”. They also insisted that the recently-concluded two-day parliamentary sitting raised more questions and answers, and without an opportunity to present their point of view in Parliament, they had “no choice” but to make their response through this public statement. Parliament, they insisted, was no place to investigate their accusations of abuse of power, given that PM Lee’s party controls almost all the seats in the House, so MPs cannot effectively question him. They also said it seems releasing “further evidence on social media” at this time will “only muddy the facts, and put pressure on government agencies to make excuses for PM Lee”. “If there is ever a truly independent inquiry to examine the evidence, they are welcome to ask. Ultimately, it is up to the people of Singapore whether they hold Lee Hsien Loong to a true accounting,” they said. Concluding their statement by saying that they are not politicians and have no wish to see Singapore “embroiled in a never-ending public argument”, they will “cease presenting further evidence on social media” on the condition that their fathers’ wishes are “not attacked or misrepresented”. They also thanked the numerous Singaporeans who had reached out to give them their support and gave their views. They said: “Ultimately, it is up to the government, and the people of Singapore, to decide whether and how to hold Lee Hsien Loong to account.” PM waives Parliamentary privilege Lee Hsien Yang and Dr Lee Wei Ling had been embroiled in a public dispute with their eldest brother PM Lee Hsien Loong over the fate of their father’s house on 38 Oxley Road which blew up in the public sphere after a six-page statement released on June 14, accusing PM Lee of abuses of power for personal gain. But during the parliamentary debate which spanned almost 11 hours across two days, none of the MPs who spoke substantiated any allegations of abuse of power hurled against PM Lee by his siblings. In contrast, the government has been shown to have “acted properly and with due process”, PM Lee said as he wrapped up the debate on Tuesday. He added that facts and explanations have been put on the record, and Singaporeans have been given “a full account of how the government works, and what the government has done, in the case of 38 Oxley Road”. Yesterday, PM Lee also waived his Parliamentary privilege and released to the media his ministerial statements and the accompanying materials, including email exchanges between family members. By doing so, it means if any part of his statement is disputed, further legal action can be pursued. — TODAY

Pave the way for the healing process for PM Lee’s family

“We all use language to communicate, to express ourselves, to get our ideas across, and to connect with the person to whom we are speaking. When a relationship is working, the act of communicating seems to flow relatively effortlessly. When a relationship is deteriorating, the act of communicating can be as frustrating as climbing a hill of sand.” – Chip Rose, attorney and mediator – I have, with much sadness, followed closely the on-going feud between Prime Minister (PM) Lee Hsien Loong and his siblings Lee Hsien Yang and Dr Lee Wei Ling.

While Workers Party Chief Low Thia Khiang and his fellow members of Parliament are of the view that the best way to settle the dispute is for PM Lee to sue his siblings for the serious allegations (“Dispute should be resolved in court: WP Chief’), I fully support PM Lee’s view that it would not do any good to sue his own siblings for they are still his own flesh and blood (Suing siblings cannot be my preferred choice, says PM Lee” Monday 3rd July 2017, The Strait Times).

It is troubling that because of this unsettled feud, the whole Lee family is paraded on the world – and for all the wrong reasons.

When it comes to getting money, often, sadly, there is no such as family. Many families get caught into this unfortunate predicament, and that’s the harsh reality. Certainly, those with special needs have to get better protection as their conditions can be taken advantage of and be deprived of a fair share when properties are sold.

While social media is useful is raising awareness of social problems, it can also be unhelpful in some ways.

If one looks at the many problems that arise in relationships, you would be able to find a common pattern – many people just don’t know how to communicate or at least communicate in an effective manner.

American psychologist, philosopher and author William James once said: “Whenever you’re in conflict with someone, there is one factor that can make the difference between damaging your relationship or deepening it. That factor is attitude.”

As with any relationship, every happy successful partnership begins and ends with the same ingredient – the willingness to negotiate. Unfortunately, as human beings, we have the tendency of not wanting to submit. We do not want to admit that we are wrong as it can be seen as “losing face.”

Bear in mind that bitterness only eats inside of us and will eventually destroy us. One problem that should not be ignored is physical illness. When you’re bitter, you’re causing your body stress, and sustained stress can make you sick. In addition, bitterness robs you of your chance to be happy.

I have always admired Dr Lee Wei Ling as she has been an extraordinary caregiver to her father, the late Mr Lee Kuan Yew. She was always there for him – often 24/7. Caregiving is extremely taxing and entails huge sacrifices. Perhaps this arduous journey could have taken a toll on her with her being bent on protecting her dad and his wishes. Dr Lee should have been given an award by the Ministry of Health and the Ministry of Family and Development for her remarkable care-giving responsibilities. It is not too late to do so.

Now that both PM Lee and his siblings have made their views public, let us put an end to the squabbling and begin the healing process. Top-notch family therapists and counsellors could help with reconciliation efforts.

For all intents and purposes, let’s remember that it takes years to build trust and just seconds to destroy it. This applies to marriage, while studying, nation-building , at the workplace and in the community.

With the Lunar New Year 7 months away, I am sure all Singaporeans would love to see the Lees reunite for the reunion dinner on the eve of this beautiful spring festival.

RAYMOND ANTHONY FERNANDO

PROFILE OF THE WRITER

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Raymond Anthony Fernando is a motivational speaker, poet, author, trainer, songwriter, freelance television actor, ghostwriter, media celebrity, regular newspaper forum page writer and an advocate for the mentally ill.

He is a volunteer with the Institute of Mental Health. The author of 32 books was married to Doris Lau Siew Lang, herself an author of 8 books. Doris was called to the Lord in April 2014. This Model Caregiver 2007 and Mental Health Champion 2010, who is born on Valentine’s Day, has contributed 31 years of service to the public sector, 15 years of experience in public relations work, and received several awards and commendations from government organisations.

Raymond attributes his success to his beloved wife, Doris, who has always been his greatest inspiration.

Hong Kong versus Singapore: Which city is better for expats?

Singapore’s push into innovation and technology has the Lion City on an upswing. — Reuters pic

HONG KONG, June 30 — In the race to lure talent for global firms’ regional headquarters, Hong Kong and Singapore have long been neck-and-neck.

While many companies make their managers locate in one or the other city — often depending on whether their duties focus more on South-east Asia, or on China — others give top talent a choice.

Back before Hong Kong’s handover to Chinese rule in 1997, Hong Kong had an edge due to expectations of the opening of China’s economy, the city’s role as the entrepot on the border, and the banking industry poised to capitalise on it.

Now, Singapore’s push into innovation and technology has the Lion City on an upswing, said Karen Koh of recruiting and consultancy firm HRnetOne, who works in the Singapore-based company’s Hong Kong office.

“Twenty years ago, Hong Kong was a more popular expat destination than Singapore because of the job opportunities or perception that banking was much hotter in Hong Kong,” she said. “I don’t think banking will ever be able to compare with Hong Kong, but other sectors in Singapore have come up.”

For expatriates considering which city to choose, here’s the ultimate Hong Kong versus Singapore guide, with prices converted to US dollars:

The top salaries in Hong Kong for jobs in the financial industry are about 25 per cent higher than in Singapore on average. — AFP pic
The top salaries in Hong Kong for jobs in the financial industry are about 25 per cent higher than in Singapore on average. — AFP pic

1. First things first: Your salary

The top salaries in Hong Kong for jobs in the financial industry are about 25 per cent higher than in Singapore on average, according to data compiled by Bloomberg from the 2017 salary survey of recruitment firm Robert Walters Plc. That trend carries across most industries.

Personal income taxes in the two cities are relatively low. The top rate in Singapore for income above the first US$230,500 (RM989,882) is 22 per cent; in Hong Kong, the top rate is 17 per cent.

Customers choose goods inside a store at a market place in Hong Kong.— Reuters pic
Customers choose goods inside a store at a market place in Hong Kong.— Reuters pic

2. What you spend your money on

Those extra dollars don’t necessarily get you as far in Hong Kong, however. The city has overtaken Tokyo as the most expensive in the region and second overall in the world for expatriates, behind only Angola’s capital Luanda, according to the latest cost of living survey from consultancy firm ECA International. Singapore, by contrast, is 24th on its list.

The survey tracks the cost of goods ranging from groceries to beer and tobacco, while excluding spending such as rent and school tuition.

Taxes on alcohol mean the price of imbibing is higher in Singapore. A pint of beer in a Singaporean pub goes for about US$9, while the same will set you back US$7.70 in Hong Kong, according to Deutsche Bank AG’s 2017 report on global consumer prices using data gathered from Expatistan.com, which compiles input from thousands of people reporting the prices they pay in various countries.

The bank’s Bad Habits Index, which combines the price of five beers and two packs of cigarettes — also heavily taxed — has Singapore ahead, at US$64.30. In Hong Kong, it’s US$53.50.

The foodie expatriate may be interested to know: Hong Kong boasts 61 Michelin-starred restaurants, including six with three stars. Singapore has 38, with its Joel Robuchon outpost the only 3-star establishment.

Overall, rent in Hong Kong is 47 per cent more expensive than in Singapore. — TODAY pic
Overall, rent in Hong Kong is 47 per cent more expensive than in Singapore. — TODAY pic

3. How much you’ll pay for housing

For most people, the single biggest cost, though, is housing — unless companies still offer housing packages, which have been increasingly dwindling.

Expat packages for both cities have been sliding for the past five years, down 2 per cent to US$265,500 in Hong Kong and 6 per cent to US$235,500 in Singapore, according to ECA’s MyExpatriate Market Pay survey.

While salaries have risen in Singapore in the same period, the decline in benefits has reduced the total package value, according to Lee Quane, ECA’s regional director for Asia.

“The cost of housing in Hong Kong is obviously higher than it is in Singapore,” said Quane in a phone interview. “Companies obviously have to reflect that in the person’s salary by either providing a higher housing allowance to the expatriates in Hong Kong or bumping up the employee’s salary.”

For those paying their own rent, Hong Kong is more expensive than Singapore by a huge margin.

Overall, rent in Hong Kong is 47 per cent more expensive, according to June data from Expatistan.com. Monthly rent for a 900-square-foot furnished residence in an expensive area costs about US$2,600 in Singapore, while the equivalent in Hong Kong costs almost US$4,900, the site said.

“The housing cost is the biggest downside for Hong Kong right now,” said Patrick Groth, Asia regional director for relocation company Crown World Mobility. “That’s a big disadvantage because you get much, much more for your money in Singapore.”

A view of the central business district in Singapore. — Reuters pic
A view of the central business district in Singapore. — Reuters pic

4. Doing business and investing money

Those looking to park their cash in local investments have done better in Hong Kong over the years. Real estate investors have seen secondary home prices soar 400per cent since the last property slump in 2003. Hong Kong’s stock market has beaten Singapore’s over the past five years, too.

International companies based in Hong Kong rose 53 per cent since 1997, totaling almost 1,400 as of last year, according to government data. Singapore, which tracks total investment by foreign companies, recorded a 12 per cent decline in the 2011-2015 period, with US companies the only ones to increase their presence.

Yet Singapore beats Hong Kong as a more attractive destination price-wise for companies, according to a report last year from DTZ/Cushman & Wakefield. Hong Kong suffers from higher costs, while Singapore boasts cheaper office rent — about half the price on a per square metre basis, the report said. Singapore ranks No. 2 in Asia, behind South Korea, and No. 6 in the world on the Bloomberg Innovation Index.

For those starting their own businesses, Singapore also ranks No. 2 in the world — after New Zealand — for how easy it is to get off the ground and through regulatory hoops, according to the World Bank’s latest ranking. Hong Kong ranks No. 4, up one place from a year before.

In Singapore, the car would cost about US$168,100 based on quoted prices from authorised distributors, according to the government’s vehicle registration website. — TODAY pic
In Singapore, the car would cost about US$168,100 based on quoted prices from authorised distributors, according to the government’s vehicle registration website. — TODAY pic

5. The price of getting a car on the road

Singapore is possibly the most expensive place in the world to drive, due to regulations and fees designed to keep traffic from turning into the chaos that befell Jakarta, Manila, Bangkok and other South-east Asian cities as incomes rose and more residents could afford to get behind the wheel.

Drivers must bid for a limited number of special permits, as well as pay a slew of taxes and recurring fees that can more than double the cost of car ownership.

An Audi A6 luxury sedan costs, all-in, about US$70,400 in Hong Kong, based on manufacturers’ suggested pricing, which includes a First Registration Tax, annual fees and insurance.

In Singapore, the car would cost about US$168,100 based on quoted prices from authorised distributors, according to the government’s vehicle registration website.

Taxis are relatively cheap, however: An 8 kilometre (5 mile) taxi ride will set you back about US$8 in both Singapore and Hong Kong, according to Expatistan data. That compares with US$22 in London and US$15 in New York, the data show.

A junk sails past the city's skyline shrouded in a dense blanket of toxic smog in Hong Kong. — AFP pic
A junk sails past the city’s skyline shrouded in a dense blanket of toxic smog in Hong Kong. — AFP pic

6. Pollution and the air that you breathe

Hong Kong became notorious for its high levels of air pollution, so the government began enacting curbs on emissions — from vehicles and heavy cargo ships using its port — as well as cooperating with officials in Guangdong province to try to reduce smog blowing across the border.

These measures have shown results. Since 1999 Hong Kong has curbed roadside levels of nitrogen oxides by 56 per cent, and fine particulate matter, known as PM2.5, by 52 per cent, according to 2016 government data.

Singapore, despite stringent vehicle emissions standards, is occasionally plagued by trouble from across its border as well: haze from Indonesian wildfires. The city suffered from another spike in 2016.

Singapore reported good or moderate air quality for 87.5 per cent of the year in 2015. That’s lower than the 97 per cent of the previous year, due to the wildfires. Hong Kong reported 247 clean air days, for 67 per cent of 2016, according to data compiled by Bloomberg based on the city’s air quality index.

Secondary school students being taught in a classroom in Singapore. — TODAY pic
Secondary school students being taught in a classroom in Singapore. — TODAY pic

7. Educating and taking care of the kids

The cost of private school rivals rent as the biggest cost in each city. Tuition for a new middle-school student at Singapore American School costs about US$36,200 if the student comes from a non-American family. At the American School Hong Kong, a similar new student entering grades 7 or 8 will need to pay about US$25,200, including the entry fee, plus either a recurring annual fee of US$2,600 or a refundable debenture of US$77,000. It’s also difficult to get a spot in a number of Hong Kong schools.

“As soon as we knew that we were moving to Hong Kong, one of our most immediate thoughts was: Start applying for schools now because it is so competitive,” said Adam Johnston, managing director with Robert Half Hong Kong Ltd, a unit of staffing firm Robert Half International Inc. and father of 1— and 3-year-old kids.

Yet Singapore’s secondary schools beat Hong Kong’s in the global Programme for International Student Assessment, or PISA, ratings. Singapore ranks at the top for math, reading and science. Hong Kong is No. 2 in reading and math, but fell to No. 9 in science in the latest test.

Most young families will also hire a domestic worker to help out. Minimum wage for such workers in Hong Kong is currently about US$550 a month, according to the government. Food, health-care and other costs are additional. In Singapore, wages for Filipino maids and nannies are mandated by the Philippine government. As of last year, they were the equivalent of US$400 a month. —Bloomberg

Immigration confirms extending Singaporeans’ detention, but denies abuse

Quek Chin Fern and her daughter, Cheryl Lim, had on June 19 pleaded guilty to shoplifting in a Kluang court and subsequently sentenced to a day’s imprisonment. — IStock.com pic via AFP

KUALA LUMPUR, June 30 ― Two Singaporeans were detained beyond their one-day prison sentence due to a separate and ongoing case, the Immigration Department said when rejecting claims of abuse in the matter.

Immigration director-general Datuk Mustafar Ali explained that Quek Chin Fern and her daughter, Cheryl Lim, had on June 19 pleaded guilty to shoplifting in a Kluang court and subsequently sentenced to a day’s imprisonment.

“JIM Johor issued a [detain and deport order] for 14 days for the two detainees to the Prisons Department according to SOP as the transfer of ‘banduan dagang’ (ex prisoner) from prison was delayed due to the Hari Raya Aidilfitri holidays. The detainees were passed to the Detention Depot on 27/6,” he said in a response to Malay Mail Online on Wednesday evening.

According to the Prisons Department’s website, the term “banduan dagang” refers to foreign nationals who are detained pending deportation and includes those who have completed their jail term and those being held under the Immigration Act.

“At the same time, there is a case related to Immigration that is ongoing and will be decided on 24/7. Subject is detained until the court case is resolved,” he said.

Mustafar was referring to the August 2016 case in which Quek and her two children ― Cheryl and Miguel Lim ― were charged under Section 56(1)(g) of the Immigration Act with allegedly refusing to cooperate with Immigration officials during inspection at the Sultan Iskandar Building Customs, Immigration and Quarantine (CIQ) checkpoint in Johor at the Malaysia-Singapore border.

Mustafar said the Special Sessions Court at the Pekan Nanas Immigration depot had at the end of the prosecution’s case decided to acquit and release the two children, while Quek was ordered to enter her defence. He noted the decision for her case will be delivered on July 24.

The Immigration also appealed to the High Court against the two children’s acquittal, he said.

He also said Quek was given bail by the court and lives on a special pass along with her children.

“In conclusion, there was no abuse of power towards detainees Quek and her daughter. All detention orders are according to SOP and laws that have been stipulated for foreigners that commit an offence in Malaysia,” he concluded when commenting on the two Singaporeans.

On Monday, local human rights group Suara Rakyat Malaysia (Suaram) condemned the extended detention of the two Singaporeans as an alleged violation of the Federal Constitution and the United Nations’ Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

Quek’s son, Miguel Lim, told Malay Mail Online of his concerns for his detained 43-year-old mother and sister, both of whom he has not seen since their detention following the June 22 jail sentence. His sister turned 19 on June 25 while in Johor’s Kluang prison, he said.

He said he only managed to speak with Quek once on June 23 after she pleaded with the authorities for a phone call, adding that his mother claimed to have dislocated her arm after her arrest and was allegedly not given medical attention.

As for the August 2016 court case, Miguel said that the trio have been stuck in Malaysia since then as their passports, car, and his handphone were seized. He said Quek is a single parent as his father had passed away.

The trio’s lawyer, Hassan Karim, earlier this week confirmed to Malay Mail Online that Quek’s two children were acquitted on May 8 as the special Sessions court had found that the prosecution had failed to show that there was a prima facie case against them, with their case to now be mentioned in the Johor Baru High Court on July 13 as the prosecution has appealed.

Hassan expressed concern over the “human rights issue” in the duo’s detention, noting that he had written and faxed a letter yesterday morning to the depot’s director to request for a visit, but was informed that he could not visit his clients without clearance from the investigating officer.

Hassan said he managed to obtain permission yesterday from the investigating officer at the Johor Baru CIQ Immigration office for him to see the duo within office hours, but will only be able to visit on Sunday as Friday and Saturday are officially off days in Johor.

Miguel said he went to the depot yesterday to try and visit his mother and sister, but was not allowed to do so, adding that he will now leave it to Hassan since the latter had obtained clearance and will be visiting this Sunday.

Miguel said the Singapore High Commission was however allowed to visit his family yesterday, claiming that it was the second time where the embassy requested for medical attention to be given.

Interview with Adeline Raja – The right person to call for your events

Adeline J Raja has an extensive experience portfolio in different working environments and we could concretely say she can handle any kind of working scenarios with her vast experience. She has also participated in several beauty pageants locally for experience and exposure. Presently she is running an events management company – Aurora Productions and Malayachronicles.com got the chance to interview her. Let’s hear from her.

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Tell us about yourself.

I am 34 years old, love running, reading, music and dance. LOVE EMCEEING! I started working at the age of 18 as a Nursery / Kindergarten teacher for 2 years. After that I joined Singapore Armed Forces (uniformed regular) and was in the logistics line for 10.5 years.

From Singapore Armed Forces, I moved to Singapore Grand Prix Formula 1 for 4 years working in the Operations department.

Currently, I am working in a Tourism & Hospitality School.

I am also running an event management company called Aurora Productions.

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Describe your typical day?

I hold a full time job as an Industry Training Coordinator at William Angliss Institute, a tourism and hospitality school, therefore I will be occupied from 9 to 6 pm. I am also pursuing my WSQ Diploma in MICE & Events course twice a week in the evenings, which will be ending in September 2017.

On my free days, I am occupied with my volunteer services with Chua Chu Kang IAEC & LISHA Women’s Wing. I will also meet my clients & friends. At other times, I will spend time with my family and concentrate on growing my business.

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What ignited the spark in you to start Aurora Productions?

I always had the keen interest in the events line and was helping friends plan and execute their events. Sometimes I do emceeing too for them. In the forces, I was always approached to emcee events and over the span of 10.5 years, I have covered almost all types of SAF events, which also includes a Senior Officers Dinner at the Istana.

Moreover, I have contacts with djs, dancers, performers, decorators and various types of entertainment requirements which might be needed for an event. My friends will contact me when they require anyone for their events.

However as I was a Civil Servant then, I was unable to run my own business. After I had left the forces, a small group of friends encouraged me to start my own events business. With the blessing of my parents, Aurora Productions was born in 2014 and growing steadily.

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Please elaborate more about your business.

  • My main forte is Emcee and DJ Services. Apart from that, I also run a full range of services for registry of marriages, weddings, birthdays and other event services required by clients.
  • We provide event consultancy services.

We also focus on budget events. We work around the client’s budget and give them the best value for their money. Our charges are very reasonable. Please contact us for our reasonable quotation.

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Who is your role model, and why?

My parents. My dad always has creative ideas that we try to twine into our daily life. My mum, runs her own spice business in the market. I always admire her patience, I tried my hands in the market when she was overseas but I did not have her level of patience and tolerance.

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How did you develop key partnerships?

  • I do lots of online research and send emails to potential companies for collaborations, both local and overseas.
  • I also attend networking events organized by the volunteer groups that I am involved in and get to know other people running their own business (either part time or full time).
  • Through social media.

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What have been some of your failures, and what have you learned from them?

My first failure was a maternity photo shoot on a yacht. We were too excited with the opening of Aurora Productions and we jumped into the wagon without doing much research. It was an eye-opener for us that any events that we run, no matter how experienced we are, if it is a new concept, research must be done.

I always emphasise my 1st event failure in any talks that I conduct, to give a small morale booster that life is not a bed of roses. There will be ups and downs in business, we have to learn from mistakes and move on.

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How do you generate new ideas?

I always get my weird ideas either at night or when I go for my runs. I listen to music while running and my mind will flourish with crazy ideas.

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What is your greatest fear, and how do you manage fear?

I do not have any fear as I know what I am doing, I do it with a conscience. As long as we have not caused any form of harm to anybody, there will not be a need to fear anything. Lead our life to the fullest as much as we can. There should not be any regrets in life when we turn back to look at our life’s journey.

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What three pieces of advice would you give to anyone who wants to become entrepreneurs.

  • Dare to dream and turn it into reality.
  • Do not be afraid to ask when you are unsure. If you fear to ask, you will never improve / upgrade yourself.
  • Research Research Research.

Please contact Adeline J Raja if you are planning any events.

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Interview with Sudha Thiagarajan – Su’s Glowdust

Sudha Thiagarajan starts her day with a daily stimulant (find out what it is in the interview) and music keeps her company when travelling. She upgrades herself constantly to keep up the lead in her business. Find out what she does and what are her childhood dreams in this exclusive interview with Malayachronicles.com.

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Tell us about yourself.

Being a very passionate person about arts, I have different perspective about life. I tend to view things with a creative mind, and challenge myself to harness beauty . I love making people feel good about them. It gives me a heart-felt happiness. I day dream as well, always overflowing with ideas .

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Describe your typical day.

I must start off my day with my daily stimulant, coffee. That gives me the boost. Melodious music is a must when travelling to my destinations. I meet friends for networking and for new opportunities. I end my day reading books relevant to my growth. I do meditation daily to connect within myself.

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What ignited the spark in you to start Su’s Glowdust?

It started as a childhood dream, I used to have lots of imaginations like running a beauty parlor and I used to do mock-up makeup for my sister.

I love colours and appreciate beauty. My close friends also motivated me to excel in this beauty industry.

To me ,”Makeup is a magic, and each time I do a makeup. It makes me feel like a magician.”

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Please elaborate more about your business.

I do the following:

  • Make up Workshops.
  • Different types of Sari Draping Workshops.
  • Hair Styling Workshops.

I also have an online business selling ‘Motives’ cosmetics. I also educate and recommend my customers with essential vitamins and supplements.

I also do make up for individuals or groups for their special occasions. I also welcome photo shoot make-ups.

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Who is your role model, and why?

Joyce Kingsly, Lisha’s Women Wing Chairperson. She has empowered many ladies with leadership qualities by being a good leader herself. Her calmness and patience, in all situations , and opening possibilities for women, made me look up to her as my role model.

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What mindsets helped make you successful?

Having the entrepreneurial mindset on how to tap my creativity to monetise. Its just not about monetising but how to add values to people’s lives.

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What have been some of your failures, and what have you learned from them?

Every setback that I have been through only made me wiser. It gave me the opportunity to learn in avoiding the mistakes, and I continuously upgrade my skills for betterment.

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How did you distinguish yourself from your competitors?

The belief I have in myself. I always have a synchronicity in my thoughts and actions to deliver well.

I also place my clients as my priority.

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What is your greatest fear, and how do you manage fear?

My greatest fear , is worrying about my health. Due to my nature of work I tend to have less rest. I am taking my supplements to boost my system and vitality.

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What three pieces of advice would you give to anyone who wants to become entrepreneurs.

  • Have a hunger for knowledge for your self growth.
  • Listen to successful entrepreneurs and learn from them.
  • Constantly upgrade your skills according to needs.

Please contact Sudha Thiagarajan to attend her workshops and also for your makeup needs.

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